Steroids for upper airway edema

Patients will be prescribed antibiotics after surgery, and should finish all the pills that have been prescribed. Some form of a narcotic may also be prescribed and is to be taken as needed. If patients require narcotics, they are cautioned not to drive. In some situations the doctor may prescribe steroids to reduce inflammation either preoperatively and/or postoperatively. It is very important that patients take this medication as prescribed, and not discontinue it prematurely. If patients have nausea or vomiting postoperatively, they may be prescribed anti-nausea medications ( antiemetics ). If patients have any questions or they feel they are developing a reaction to any of these medications, they should consult their doctor. Patients should not take any other medication, either prescribed or over-the-counter, unless they have discussed the medications with the doctor.

In cases that involve pneumonia or other advanced respiratory disease, the attending veterinarian may recommend empirical antibiotic treatment while waiting for the results of culture and sensitivity on samples of upper respiratory tract secretions. The results of those tests will identify which pathogens are causing the dog’s illness, and will enable the veterinarian to select the best antibiotic or antiviral therapy. Empirical antibiotic therapy is a “let’s-take-our-best-guess” approach that often is successful and has few, if any, adverse side effects (except for possible gastrointestinal upset and contribution to antibiotic resistant strains of infectious bacteria). Dogs with bacterial pneumonia usually are treated with antibiotics for 1 to 4 weeks after the radiographic signs of pneumonia are resolved. A veterinarian is the best person to recommend an appropriate treatment protocol for a dog showing signs of upper respiratory tract disease.

Oxygen therapy is frequently provided along with pharmacological interventions to treat underlying hypoxemia in COPD patients. By reducing hypoxia in the alveoli, pulmonary vasoconstriction is reduced. Reducing pulmonary hypertension lowers right heart afterload, and improves right heart systolic function. Oxygen also reduces hypoxemia in the blood, which reduces the risk of developing polycythemia. However, oxygen therapy has only been shown to reduce mortality in those with severe hypoxemia (PaO2 < 55mmHg); otherwise there is no mortality benefit.

Aerosolized corticosteroids are effective in horses with mild to moderate RAO, and can be used in conjunction with systemic therapy in severe cases. The two aerosolized preparations for administration to horses via the Equine AeroMask, Equine Haler, or AeroHippus are beclomethasone diproprionate and fluticasone propionate. Inhaled therapies are beneficial because of reduced side effects from the corticosteroid administration (such as laminitis in rare cases on systemic steroids). However, inhaled therapies tend to require an upfront financial investment to purchase the mask and medications. Despite the financial costs, inhaled treatments target inflammation and allergy directly at the site of the problem, in the lungs. Additionally, horses in apparent “remission” from RAO may benefit from low dose, long term, aerosolized corticosteroid treatment. Depending on the clinical signs and severity of RAO, horses with this condition can be managed successfully for much if not most of their lives. Many of these horses are able to be excellent pleasure, trail riding, or even competition horses with dedicated owners that understand that it is a considered a chronic condition that will require life-long management.

Steroids for upper airway edema

steroids for upper airway edema

Aerosolized corticosteroids are effective in horses with mild to moderate RAO, and can be used in conjunction with systemic therapy in severe cases. The two aerosolized preparations for administration to horses via the Equine AeroMask, Equine Haler, or AeroHippus are beclomethasone diproprionate and fluticasone propionate. Inhaled therapies are beneficial because of reduced side effects from the corticosteroid administration (such as laminitis in rare cases on systemic steroids). However, inhaled therapies tend to require an upfront financial investment to purchase the mask and medications. Despite the financial costs, inhaled treatments target inflammation and allergy directly at the site of the problem, in the lungs. Additionally, horses in apparent “remission” from RAO may benefit from low dose, long term, aerosolized corticosteroid treatment. Depending on the clinical signs and severity of RAO, horses with this condition can be managed successfully for much if not most of their lives. Many of these horses are able to be excellent pleasure, trail riding, or even competition horses with dedicated owners that understand that it is a considered a chronic condition that will require life-long management.

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